late september

September 28, 2013 § 3 Comments

sliced watermelon

I had a dismal attempt at trying to grow watermelons this year. The process started with me very excited. I made a little round bed full of compost and manure and planted two little seeds inside. They sprouted and grew… A little… I watered them and they grew some more. They bloomed tiny little flowers and even grew one tiny little watermelon. Then I went away and the little watermelon shrivelled up. Then the rest of the vine shrivelled. And one day they were dead. And that was that.

The sun is relentless here. Unforgiving.  I realise my mistake, I shouldn’t have put them in a place that gets all day sun, and I should definitely have mulched them more.

But still, I have been managing to eat some of the very best watermellons I ever had. The local ones are cheep and abundant at this time of year. They are a deep bright pink and so so sweet.

Watermelon and cider vinegar tonic

So I have a recipe for you today, a drink, and a very refreshing one at that. It comes out of the beautiful cookbook The New Persian Kitchen. Its a watermelon, mint, and cider vinegar tonic!

Author Notes: “Even if drinking vinegar sounds like a dare — and maybe that’s why you ordered it — it’s anything but. It’s sweet and sour and icy-cold. It vibrates and clangs with fruit and vinegar, and soothes with sweetness and mint. It is the most refreshing drink you will have this summer”. From The New Persian Kitchen

watermelon in measuring jug

Recipe for Watermelon Mint and Cider Vinegar Tonic

Makes about 5 cups concentrate

3 cups water, plus more to serve
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
1 cup honey
6 cups coarsely chopped watermelon
1 cup tightly packed fresh mint, plus more to serve
1 cup apple cider vinegar (preferably with the mother because that is the best kind for you)
Ice cubes, cucumber, and lime to serve.

watermelon, mint, honey, water, vinegar
  • Boil the water and salt in a medium saucepan. Add the honey and allow to dissolve before removing from the heat.
  • Combine the watermelon and mint in a large bowl and stir in the hot honey water.  Leave to cool to room temperature.
  • Once cool, add the vinegar and allow the mixture to steep in the refrigerator for several hours or up to overnight.
  • Strain the mixture and eat the watermelon chunks, if desired.
  • Store the concentrate in a clean glass jar in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.
  • To serve, pour 1/4 cup of the concentrate into a glass over ice and dilute with 3/4 cup water. Garnish with the watermelon, cucumber, and mint.
Watermelon and apple cider vinegar tonic

weaving in Mäpuru

September 15, 2013 § Leave a comment

roots and leaves for dyeing pandanas

 

roots for dyeing

 

dyeing pandanas over the fire

 

dyed pandanas drying in the sun

 

pandanas ready for weaving

 

weaving

 

a finished basket

These are some photos from my most recent trip out to Arnhem Land.

You can read what I wrote when I travelled out to Mäpuru last year by following this link. http://ceresglobal.wordpress.com/2012/08/29/glimpsing-mapuru/

Papua New Guinea

July 26, 2013 § 1 Comment

Tulip leaves

I am typing these words all the way from Papua New Guinea! There are tiny ants crawling all over my laptop and getting squished between the keys. I must have eaten something sweet and forgotten to wash my fingers, they are relentless! Over the top of my laptop, I look out from the verandah to a dense, tropical scene. With fertile soil, abundant moisture and warm conditions, PNG is lush, green, and plump. The clouds are bubbly and ready to burst with rain. Trees, tall and straight with broad canopies, seem to defy gravity, growing on unimaginably steep mountain slopes.

I really like this country. I am not sure if I have met more gentle people. They remind me of my friends and family in Arnhem Land; soft and graceful like the surrounding landscape. The women have huge embraces that envelope you tightly, generously.

This is a journey that work has led me on. I am here working on a project through Charles Darwin University in partnership with the PNG National Agricultural Research Institute. We are looking into why the production and consumption of traditional vegetables is in decline and how this relates to increasing rates of malnutrition.  For me it also involves taking photos of food and recording traditional recipes. I couldn’t be happier!

Traditional PNG vegetables at the market

As always, I end up in the kitchen talking to the women. They show me how to cook the traditional foods – choko and pumpkin tips fried in oil with a little garlic, tu-lip shoots a tasty favourite, taro root, sago, fern tips, lowland pitpit and of course pork belly, and pork fat, and minced pork and pork ribs – well you get the picture.

Pigs are regarded very highly, especially for the inland populations. I am told that in the past, women used to suckle baby pigs on their breasts and they slept in the house with the family. I was also told (in jest) that pigs are more important than women because,  “you can buy a wife with pigs, but you can’t buy a pig with a wife.”  Obviously one can argue that without the women doing all the hard work to raise the pigs, the men wouldn’t have any to begin with, but I suppose that’s beside the point.

wild places

July 8, 2013 § Leave a comment

A weekend away out bush has left me longing for more  time in wild places. To lay under the stars, my back wrapped against the curve of the earth, feeling the fragile wieght of it beneath me. Hollow, like the shell of an egg holding me up. Weightless. The vastness of the stars above refected in the vastness of the molecuelar detail of the earth below. These two reflections at once extraordinary, large, elegant, detailed and paradoxically humbling and simple.   The sun rises and sets, the earth continues its orbit, the moon spins, the sky turns. The water falls across the rocks, the leaves under foot crackle as they dry in the heat, the earth breathes in and out, my breath rolls along with it.

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basil and papaya

June 6, 2013 § 2 Comments

Cut papaya and basil

squeezed limes

If you are one of those people who like papaya, this one is for you. I know, I have done it before with strawberries and basil, a recipe good enough to serve to the prime minister of Australia, and perhaps I should have just left it at that. But  with fresh papayas straight from the tree in our back yard and thai basil and limes also in the garden I couldn’t help myself.

I can’t promise it will blow your socks off but papaya, lime and thai basil salad is in every way good. The pictures say it all.

Papaya and basil salad

a house with trees

May 28, 2013 § Leave a comment

Time has lost me. I’m well behind now – lagging in a place I slowed down in 3 months ago. It could be the heat – sticky and stiff, it could just be me. My heart is beating its own timely rhythm, its willing me on. I am aware that this is the only sound I should be listening to, but sometimes I am not so sure I want to. SometimesI am deep, relaxed, peaceful in a place within myself. And yet, other times its as if I am drowning in all this beating, slow, quiet place of time.

From the couch, I look out over our kitchen table through the wide open louvres onto a big bushy mess of galangal growing tall and stalky. I had no idea it could grow so big, so tall, provide so much blissful shade. It’s a wonderful scene to look out on and its these little things that I am enjoying in all my time. The green in our house, breathing down our backs, cupping our little lives in their chlorophyll drenched leaves, whispering barely audible stories. Slow modest stories of patience, and being where you are and nowhere else. They nod in the breeze, in agreement to my thoughts, they shrink in the sun and bask in the night – cool relief. This is our green drenched home in inner city Darwin.

Galangal plant

Banana leaf with glangal in background

Evening light through trees 2

Evening light through trees 1

Palm

rosellas

May 21, 2013 § 1 Comment

rosella flowers

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I found these at the markets the other day.  I have been told you can turn them into jam, cordial, champaigne ornamentals, or a surprise in a loaf of bread. But from the sounds of it, and from the very small nibble I had, they are best drenched, soaked, or boiled in sugar. Their magic is that when wet they unfurl, like little aliens stretching out their arms staining everything red.  As you may have gathered, I made jam. Its cooling in jars on the bench as we speak.

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